Monthly Archives: July 2017

The Name of the Artist

“You can’t see the forest for the trees!” That charge is leveled against one so preoccupied with details that he misses the big picture.

Misers are hoarders of money. Obsessed with obtaining and holding it for its own sake, they miss the blessings which come from spending wisely, and the greater blessings of giving (Acts 20:35).

So it is with us and this vast universe with all it contains, including this beautiful earth with the superabundance and near infinite diversity of life teeming upon it. This theater of variegated glory is often called NATURE.

Are we getting the message written in this forest of magnificent beauty? Like Dickens’ character Scrooge (before his reclamation) have we abandoned the stewardship assigned to us, merely sitting on this treasure chest so deep and wide?

Admittedly, those two questions are pregnant with presupposition. They assume that someone wrote the message, and that someone assigned the stewardship. The signers of the American Declaration of Independence recognized that Someone, for they referred not only to nature, but to nature’s God.

The point is this. When we gaze with amazement at nature but go no further than admiration of nature, we are not seeing the “forest” (God’s glory) for the trees. When we are astonished by the intricate wonders of the wisely ordered creation but are not drawn to adore and thank the Creator, we have no excuse. Those who assign purposelessness and chaos to what we all see will learn their grave error, hopefully before it is too late for that schooling to do them any good.

Theologians have given us a helpful insight. They speak of special revelation and general revelation. Special revelation is verbal. When originally given, it was often attested by mighty signs and wonders which simply made manifest God’s perpetual, utterly sovereign control over creation and its ordinary rules and processes – such as Jesus walking on water.

This special, verbal revelation is on record: we call it the holy Bible. Not all humanity has knowledge of it, although thankfully in our time those who do not are becoming an increasingly tiny minority. And it is doing the majority a lot of good.

General revelation IS given to all humanity, through the creation. In fact, the primary purpose of creation is to reveal (give revelation of) its Creator! The Bible teaches this in portions such as the 19th Psalm, a song written by King David. David begins his doxology with “…the heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament shows His handiwork. Day unto day utters speech, and night unto night reveals knowledge. There is no speech nor language where their voice is not heard.”

Centuries later, the apostle Paul expounded on the purpose of general revelation. This is what he wrote to the early disciples of Christ in Rome: “For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse…”

Imagine seeing a masterpiece painting for the first time. You see no “special revelation” in the form of a placard below the frame providing the artist’s name, nor a title for the piece, nor any other information. Would you say that the painting just popped into existence out of chaos, or that it has no meaning or purpose? Would you deny that an artist produced the masterpiece?

That is exactly what those who fail to even acknowledge nature’s God are doing when they gaze upon nature and get no further. For this they will be held culpable, despite whatever alibis they offer in the name of philosophy or science. The very purpose of the entire universe is to showcase God’s eternal and unfathomable wisdom, power, and glory. He is the owner of this wonderful Earth (Psalm 24:1 et. al.) Who made mankind its stewards. And we will give account to Him of our stewardship.

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The Jonah Coin, Part Two

From last week:

Soon they were out on the waves, the sea breeze filling their lungs and the sun on their bare backs. At the proper time, they began to haul in their net. All of a sudden, Hosea’s end began to slip! “Careful, son, we’re losing it!”, shouted Eli. As both father and son lunged for the thick edge of the net, Hosea’s stater slipped out of the tunic rolled around his waist. It flew through the air. Hosea saw it land in the middle of the catch of fish which was quickly slipping out of the net. It disappeared. Eli grabbed the sagging end of the net and the three pulled in what was left of their catch. No one said a word for the rest of the day.

It was Hosea’s grandpa who broke the silence on the way home from the shore. “Hosea, I heard the Teacher once myself, you know.”

The sad boy looked in amazement at his strong and gentle grandfather.

“That’s right. And do you know what He said?” Hosea hoped that somehow the words of the Man from Nazareth would comfort him. His grandpa continued. “He said, `Do not lay up for yourselves treasure on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be, also.’ Do you know what the Teacher meant, Hosea?”

The boy struggled to hold back his tears. “I…I think so, grandpa”, he sobbed. “I…I guess He meant that my stater is not really a treasure… is that right? Does the Teacher mean that I should not be too sad about losing it?”

“That’s what He meant”, said the older Hosea. “Now why don’t you and I talk to God about this?” The two bowed their heads to pray. After his grandpa prayed, Hosea prayed. “Lord, help me to know the true treasures like the Teacher said”. He recalled how his grandpa had suggested that he leave his coin at home. “And please help me to listen to my grandpa’s good advice, Lord!” The older Hosea hugged his namesake as they went inside for the night.

Several days later, Eli, Hosea and his grandpa were mending nets by the shore of Galilee with some other fishermen. There was a small commotion as a man approached. “That’s Simon Peter!”, said Eli. “He’s one of the men who travels with Jesus of Nazareth!” Hosea was instantly interested. He wandered over to where Simon was speaking to some of the men.

“…So those who collect the two-drachma tax came to me and said, `Does your Rabbi not pay the two-drachma tax?’ So I told them He does. And when I went into the house, Jesus asked me, `What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth collect customs or poll-tax, from their sons or from strangers?’ When I answered,`From strangers’, He said, `Consequently the sons are exempt. But, lest we give them offense, go to the sea, and throw in a hook, and take the first fish that comes up; and when you open its mouth, you will find a stater. Take that and give it to them for you and Me.’ So…here I am!”, continued Simon. “May I use someone’s line and hook?”

According to Jesus’ words, the large fish which Simon soon caught had a stater in its mouth. The future apostle went his thoughtful way and the astonished fishermen eventually went back to their nets, but only a certain new fisherman named Hosea knew the secret.

He could not wait until he had a chance to meet Jesus of Nazareth. He would tell Him all about it.

This short story is based on that portion of the sacred history recorded in the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 17

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The Jonah Coin, Part One

Hosea was an Israelite boy who lived during the earthly life of the Lord Jesus. He was named after the prophet Hosea, and his wise grandpa had the same name. Hosea’s grandpa as well as his dad, Eli, were fishermen. Hosea wanted to be a fisherman, too.

Today was a big day for Hosea. It was his first time to work on the fishing boat with his dad and grandpa! He was very excited as he walked toward the sea with all the fishermen from Capernaum, Hosea’s home town. Hosea easily picked out his family’s fishing boat from the rest, and he was the first one on board. Like a good seaman, he obeyed his dad as they prepared to sail.

“Make sure that net is bundled like I showed you, son”, his dad cried. Hosea scurried to see that the net was not tangled. “Are the oars stowed”? asked Eli. Soon the little boat joined dozens of others out on the sea of Galilee. It was a warm, sunny day. Hosea loved it. They laughed and talked and sang as they worked. It was over too soon for Hosea, but he was filled with joy as the three brought their catch home.

The next day and all that week, Hosea fished with his dad, grandpa, and sometimes other men of their family. Hosea learned so much! He not only learned about fishing, but he listened carefully as the older men talked about Jesus of Nazareth, the Teacher. Hosea’s older cousin Jacob knew a lot about Jesus.

“I knew two brothers, James and John the sons of Zebedee”, said Jacob. “They were fishermen like us. One day the Teacher asked them to come with Him. They left right away! I saw them again not too long ago, and they invited me to come and hear Jesus. I went, and now I want to see Him again. I’ve never heard any of the synagogue leaders speak like this Man!” Hosea made up his mind that one day he would like to meet Jesus, too.

On the last day of the week, the family brought their catch of fish ashore a little earlier than other days, and began the special work that would last until the sun went down. It was the day of preparation for the Sabbath the next day. At the very end of the day, Eli called Hosea aside.

“Son, you’ve done a great job for your first week on board! Here is your pay.” Eli gave his son one shiny coin. It was a stater, and worth four days pay for a man! “It’s not a full week’s pay”, continued Hosea’s dad, “but you will soon be earning the same as any man, if you keep learning and doing as well as you have.”

Hosea was delighted. He knew that his dad was not a rich man, and he did not expected to paid at all, at least not yet! Hosea’s grandpa winked at Eli as Hosea threw his arms around his dad and thanked him. The happy trio walked home to Hosea’s mom, Mahlah, and the dinner she had waiting for them.

On the first working day of the next week, the young fisherman again headed for the boats. This time he proudly tossed the bright coin into the air over and over. He hoped that some of the younger boys of Capernaum would see it. His grandpa noticed what he was doing.

“Don’t you think you should run back home and leave your stater there for safekeeping, Hosea?”, he asked.

“Oh, don’t worry, Grandpa”, replied the youth. Hosea ran ahead as the older man sighed and shook his head.

Soon they were out on the waves, the sea breeze filling their lungs and the sun on their bare backs. At the proper time, they began to haul in their net. All of a sudden, Hosea’s end began to slip! “Careful, son, we’re losing it!”, shouted Eli. As both father and son lunged for the thick edge of the net, Hosea’s stater slipped out of the tunic rolled around his waist. It flew through the air. Hosea saw it land in the middle of the catch of fish which was quickly slipping out of the net. It disappeared. Eli grabbed the sagging end of the net and the three pulled in what was left of their catch. No one said a word for the rest of the day.

to be continued…

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